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Posts from 2019

Google fosters the open source hardware community

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Open source silicon promises new challenges and opportunities for both industry and the open source community. To take full advantage of open silicon we will need new design methodologies, new governance models, and increased collaborations between industry, academia, and not for profits. A vibrant free and open source software community has been vital to both Google and our customer’s success. We look forward to supporting the new domain of open source silicon to similarly benefit all participants.

Working through its Open Source Programs Office (OSPO), Google is actively engaged in helping seed the open silicon space. Specifically by providing funding, strategic, and legal support to key open hardware efforts including lowRISC and CHIPS alliance.

lowRISC

lowRISC is a leader in open silicon community outreach, technical documentation, and advancing the goal of a truly open source system on a chip. We have long supported lowRISC’s mission of transparently implemented silicon and robust engagement of the open source silicon community, providing funding, advice, and recognizing their open source community leadership by selecting them as a Google Summer of Code mentoring organization.

Similar to the benefits of open source software, we believe our users will derive great outcomes from open source silicon. Besides enabling and encouraging innovation, chip designs derived from a common, open baseline will provide the benefit of implementation choice while still guaranteeing software compatibility and a set of common interfaces. With regards to security, the transparency of an open source approach is critical to both bugfinding and establishing implementation trustworthiness.

"Google has encouraged and supported lowRISC since the very start. They clearly share our optimism for what open source hardware can offer and our community-driven vision of the future. We are excited by the expanding open source RISC-V ecosystem and look forward to lowRISC community IP being deployed in the real world,” said Alex Bradbury, Co-founder and Director. “We believe lowRISC can act as an important catalyst for open source silicon, providing a shared engineering resource to ensure quality, provide support and help to maintain IP from a range of partners.”
lowRISC board members (L to R): Dominic Rizzo (Google), Alex Bradbury (lowRISC), Gavin Ferris (lowRISC), Dr Robert Mullins (University of Cambridge), Prof. Luca Benini (ETH Zürich), and Ron Minnich (Google, not pictured).
A first example of Google’s ongoing collaboration with ETH Zürich and lowRISC is the recently released “Ibex” RISC-V core. ETH Zürich donated their Zero-riscy core as a starting point and technical work to extend the core was done across all three organizations. You can learn more about Google’s collaboration with lowRISC on the RISC-V core here.

Furthermore, Google is excited to announce that it is joining the board of lowRISC, with the appointment of Dominic Rizzo and Ronald Minnich as corporate directors.

CHIPS Alliance 

Along with our increased funding, support and collaboration with lowRISC, we are also happy to announce our status as a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s CHIPS Alliance project. CHIPS Alliance features an industry-driven, collaborative model to release high-quality silicon IP and supporting technical collateral. Most recently, in collaboration with CHIPS Alliance, we released a Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) instruction stream generator to aid in the verification of RISC-V cores. We believe such open sourcing of verification tools will prove critical to the long-term success of the open source silicon community.

Google has been an early, strong supporter of the open silicon community. We believe deeply in a future where transparent, trustworthy open source chip designs are commonplace. To get there, we are committed to establishing a collaborative, community-focused, open source basis for free and open silicon design.

By Parthasarathy Ranganathan, Distinguished Engineer, Google and Dominic Rizzo, Open Silicon Tech Lead, Google 

Summer is here! Welcome to our 2019 GSoC Students!

Monday, May 6, 2019


After reviewing 7,555 student proposals, our 206 mentoring organizations have chosen the 1,276 students they will be working with during the 15th Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Congratulations to our 2019 GSoC students and a big thank you to everyone who applied. This year’s students come from 64 countries!

The next step for participating students is the Community Bonding period which runs from May 6 through May 27. During this time, students will get up to speed on the culture and code base of their new community. They’ll also get acquainted with their mentor(s) and learn more about the languages or tools that they will need to complete their projects. Coding begins May 27 and will continue throughout the summer until August 26.

If you were not selected for this year’s Summer of Code - don’t be discouraged! Many students apply more than once to GSoC before being accepted. You can improve your odds for next time by contributing to the open source project of your choice directly now; organizations are always eager for new contributors! Look around for a project that interests you and get started.

Happy coding, everyone!

By Stephanie Taylor, GSoC Program Lead

Season of Docs announces participating organizations

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Season of Docs has announced the 50 participating open source organizations! You can view the list of participating organizations on the website.

Technical writer applications open on May 29, 2019 at 18:00 UTC. 

During the technical writer exploration phase, which runs from now until May 28, 2019, technical writers can explore the list of participating organizations and their project ideas. They should reach out to the organizations to gain a better understanding of the organizations and discuss project ideas before applying to Season of Docs.

For more information about the technical writer exploration phase, visit the technical writer guide on the website.

What is Season of Docs?

Documentation is essential to the adoption of open source projects as well as to the success of their communities. Season of Docs brings together technical writers and open source projects to foster collaboration and improve documentation in the open source space. You can find out more about the program on the introduction page of the website.

During the program, technical writers spend a few months working closely with an open source community. They bring their technical writing expertise to the project's documentation and, at the same time, learn about the open source project and new technologies.

The open source projects work with the technical writers to improve the project's documentation and processes. Together, they may choose to build a new documentation set, redesign the existing docs, or improve and document the project's contribution procedures and onboarding experience.

How do I take part in Season of Docs as a technical writer?

First, take a look at the technical writer guide on the website. The guide includes information on eligibility and the application process.

The technical writer exploration phase runs from April 30 - May 28, 2019. During this period, you can explore the list of participating organizations and their project ideas. When you find one or more projects that interest you, you should approach the relevant open source organization directly to discuss project ideas.

Then, read create a technical writing application and prepare your application materials. On May 29, 2019 at 18:00 UTC, Season of Docs will begin accepting technical writer applications and publish a link to the application form on the website. The deadline for technical writer applications is June 28, 2019 at 18:00 UTC.

Is there a stipend for participating technical writers?

Yes. There is an optional stipend that technical writers can request as part of their application. The stipend amount is calculated based on the technical writer's home location. See the technical writer stipends page for more information.

If you have any questions about the program, please email us at season-of-docs-support@googlegroups.com.

General timeline

  • April 30 - May 28: Technical writers explore the list of participating organizations and project ideas.
  • May 29 - June 28: Technical writers submit their proposals to Season of Docs. 
  • July 30: Google announces the accepted technical writer projects
  • August 1 - September 1: Community bonding: Technical writers get to know mentors and the open source community, and refine their projects in collaboration with their mentors.
  • September 2 - November 29: Technical writers work with open source mentors on the accepted projects, and submit their work at the end of the period.
  • December 10: Google publishes the list of successfully-completed projects.
See the full timeline for details, including the provision for projects that run longer than three months.

Care to join us?

Explore the Season of Docs website at g.co/seasonofdocs to learn more about participating in the program. Use our logo and other promotional resources to spread the word. Examine the timeline, check out the FAQ, and apply now!

By Andrew Chen, Google Open Source and Sarah Maddox, Google Technical Writer

Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners are here!

Friday, April 26, 2019

At Google we’ve always used open source to innovate, build amazing products, and bring better technology to the world. We also enjoy being part of the community and are always looking for ways to give back.

In 2011 we launched the Google Open Source Peer Bonus program with the goal of supporting the ecosystem and sustainability of open source by rewarding external developers for their contributions to open source projects. Over the years the program has grown and expanded. Now we reward not just software developers but all types of contributors, including technical writers, user experience and graphic designers, community managers and marketers, mentors and educators, ops and security experts.

We are very pleased to announce the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus Winners and their projects. We have a record number of 90 recipients this cycle representing 20 countries all over the world: Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, Ukraine and USA.

Below is the list of projects and awardees who gave us permission to thank them publicly:
Name Project Name Project
Cyril Tovena Agones Vincent Demeester Knative Build Pipeline
Rebecca Close AMPHTML Nader Ziada knative/build
Leon Tan AMPHTML Jim Angel Kubernetes
Wassim Chegham Angular Zach Arnold Kubernetes
Paul Gschwendtner Angular Material Serguei Bezverkhi Kubernetes
Maxim Koretskyi Angular-in-depth blog Damini Satya Kammakomati Kubernetes
Kaxil Naik Apache Airflow Jennifer Rondeau Kubernetes
Kohei Sutou Apache Arrow Michael Fromberger Kythe
Matthias Baetens Apache Beam Mark Brown Linux kernel
Lukazs Gajowy Apache Beam Luis Chamberlain Linux Kernel
Suneel Marthi Apache Beam Tetsuo Handa Linux kernel
Maximilian Michels Apache Beam Takashi Iwai Linux kernel
Alex Van Boxel Apache Beam Heiko Stuebner Linux Kernel
Thomas Weise Apache Beam Cong Wang Linux kernel
Julian Hyde Apache Calcite Richard Hughes Linux Vendor Firmware Service
Lan Sun Apache Groovy Aaron Puchert LLVM/ Clang
Campion Fellin Apps Script CLI – Clasp Orne Brocaar LoRa Server
Nicolò Ribaudo Babel Graeme Rocher Micronaut
Rong Jie Loo Bazel Anders F Björklund minikube
Dave Mielke BRLTTY Iskren Chernev Moment JS
Raphael Kubo da Costa Chromium Tim Deschryver NgRx
Mike Banon coreboot Brandon Roberts NgRx
Elyes Haouas coreboot Eelco Dolstra NixOS
Angel Pons coreboot Guy Bedford Node.js
Ansgar Burchardt Debian Yaw Anokwa Open Data Kit
Chris Lamb Debian's Reproducible Builds Andreas Bartels Open Location Code
Zach Leatherman eleventy Wes McKinney pandas
Vladimir Glavnyy FlatBuffers Pradyun Gedam pip
Alexandre Ardhuin Flutter Marvin Hagemeister preact
Kyle Wong Flutter Andre Wiggins preact
Duncan Lyall Forseti Security Chris Roche protoc-gen-validate (PGV)
Ross Scroggs GAM (Google Apps Manager) Ernest Durbin Python Package Index (PyPI)
Gert van Dijk Gerrit Ramon Santamaria raylib
Luca Milanesio Gerrit Code Review Aleksa Sarai runC
David Ostrovsky Gerrit Code Review Cornelius Weig skaffold
David Pursehouse Gerrit Code Review Anton Lindqvist syzkaller
Matthias Sohn Gerrit Code Review Zdenko Podobný Tesseract
Derrick Stolee Git Keqiu Hu TonY
Roman Lebedev Google Benchmark Basarat Ali Syed TypeScript Deep Dive (book)
Florent Revest googlecartographer/cartographer_ros Peter Wong V8
Kirill Katsnelson gRPC Kevin Murray Verilog to Routing
Eddie Kohler hotcrp Darrell Commander VirtualGL
Daniel-Constantin Mierla Kamailio Lin Clark Wasi + Wasmtime
Philipp Crocoll Keepass2Android Password Safe Sébastien Helleu Weechat
Shashwathi Reddy Knative build Wesley Shields Yara
Congratulations to our recipients! We look forward to your continued support and contributions to open source!

By Maria Tabak, Google Open Source

Bringing the best of open source to Google Cloud customers

Tuesday, April 9, 2019


Google’s belief in an open cloud stems from our deep commitment to open source. We believe open source is an essential part of the public cloud: It’s the foundation of IT infrastructure worldwide and has been a part of Google’s foundation since day one. This is reflected in our contributions to projects like Kubernetes, TensorFlow, Go, and many more.

Today, we’re taking our commitment to open source to the next level by announcing strategic partnerships with leading open source-centric companies in the areas of data management and analytics, including:
  • Confluent
  • DataStax
  • Elastic
  • InfluxData
  • MongoDB
  • Neo4j
  • Redis Labs
We’ve always seen our friends in the open-source community as equal collaborators, and not simply a resource to be mined. With that in mind, we’ll be offering managed services operated by these partners that are tightly integrated into Google Cloud Platform (GCP), providing a seamless user experience across management, billing and support. This makes it easier for our enterprise customers to build on open source technologies, and it delivers on our commitment to continually support and grow these open source communities.

Making open source even more accessible with a cloud-native experience

The open-source database market is big, and growing fast. According to SearchDataManagement.com, “more than 70% of new applications developed by corporate users will run on an open source database management system, and half of the existing relational database installations built on commercial DBMS technologies will be converted to open source platforms or [are] in the process of being converted."

This mirrors what we hear from our customers—that you want to be able to use open-source technology easily and in a cloud-native way. The partnerships we are announcing today make this possible by offering an elevated experience similar to Google’s native services. It also means that you aren’t locked in or out when you are using these technologies—we think that’s important for our customers and our partners.

Here are some of the benefits these partnerships will offer:
  • Fully managed services running in the cloud, with best efforts made to optimize performance and latency between the service and application.
  • A single user interface to manage apps, which includes the ability to provision and manage the service from the Google Cloud Console.
  • Unified billing, so you get one invoice from Google Cloud that includes the partner’s service.
  • Google Cloud support for the majority of these partners, so you can manage and log support tickets in a single window and not have to deal with different providers.
To further our mission of making GCP the best destination for open source-based services, we will work with our partners to build integrations with native GCP services like Stackdriver for monitoring and IAM, validate these services for security, and optimize performance for users.

Partnering with leaders in open source

The partners we are announcing today include several of the top-ranked databases in their respective categories. We’re working alongside these creators and supporting the growth of these companies’ technologies to inspire strong customer experiences and adoption. These new partners include:

Confluent: Founded by the team that built Apache Kafka, Confluent builds an event streaming platform that lets companies easily access data as real-time streams. Learn more.

DataStax: DataStax powers enterprises with its always-on, distributed cloud database built on Apache Cassandra and designed for hybrid cloud. Learn more.

Elastic: As the creators of the Elastic Stack, Elastic builds self-managed and SaaS offerings that make data usable in real time and at scale for search use cases, like logging, security, and analytics. Learn more.

InfluxData: InfluxData’s time series platform can instrument, observe, learn and automate any system, application and business process across a variety of use cases. InfluxDB (developed by InfluxData) is an open-source time series database optimized for fast, high-availability storage and retrieval of time series data in fields such as operations monitoring, application metrics, IoT sensor data, and real-time analytics. Learn more.

MongoDB: MongoDB is a modern, general-purpose database platform that brings software and data to developers and the applications they build, with a flexible model and control over data location. Learn more.

Neo4j: Neo4j is a native graph database platform specifically optimized to map, store, and traverse networks of highly connected data to reveal invisible contexts and hidden relationships. By analyzing data points and the connections between them, Neo4j powers real-time applications. Learn more.

Redis Labs: Redis Labs is the home of Redis, the world’s most popular in-memory database, and commercial provider of Redis Enterprise. It offers performance, reliability, and flexibility for personalization, machine learning, IoT, search, e-commerce, social, and metering solutions worldwide. Learn more.

We’re pleased to bring these partner technologies to you. Partnering with the companies that invest in developing open-source technologies means you get benefits like expertise in operating these services at scale, additional enterprise features, and shorter cycles in bringing the latest innovation to the cloud. 

We look forward to seeing what you build with these open source technologies. Learn more here about open source on GCP.

By Chris DiBona, Director, Open Source and Kevin Ichhpurani, Corporate VP, Global Ecosystem and Business Development

Cross-posted from the Google Cloud Blog

Season of Docs now accepting organization applications

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

The newly launched Season of Docs program is excited to announce that organization applications are now open!

Deadline for organization applications:
April 23, 2019 at 20:00 UTC. 

Documentation is essential to the adoption of open source projects as well as to the success of their communities. Consequently, Season of Docs was created to bring together technical writers and open source projects to foster collaboration and improve documentation in the open source space. You can find out more about the program on the introduction page of the website.

How does my organization apply to take part in Season of Docs?

Open source organizations can now submit applications to participate in Season of Docs. First, read the organization administrator guide and guidelines for creating an organization application on the Season of Docs website.

Organizations can submit their applications here: https://forms.gle/axk8AvV561K2cT6S6.

Your organization application should include one or more projects that you would like a technical writer to work on. Take a look at the examples of project ideas, then describe one or more specific projects based on your open source project’s actual documentation needs. Your goal is to attract technical writers to your organization, making them feel comfortable about approaching the organization and excited about what they can achieve in collaboration with your mentors.

Reach out to your community members to see who would like to be a mentor for Season of Docs. They may also have great suggestions for project ideas. Mentors don’t need technical writing skills. Instead, they are members of the open source organization who know the value of good documentation and who are experienced in your organization’s processes and tools. See the guidelines on working with a technical writer.

Once you have selected mentors for your organization, have them register with Season of Docs using this form: https://forms.gle/a1x26WQGzURLerv66.

Organization applications close on April 23 at 20:00 UTC.

If you have any questions about the program, please email us at season-of-docs-support@googlegroups.com.

General timeline

  • April 2-23: Open source organizations apply to take part in Season of Docs
  • April 30: Google publishes the list of accepted mentoring organizations, along with their ideas for documentation projects
  • April 30 - June 28: Technical writers choose the project they’d like to work on and submit their proposals to Season of Docs 
  • July 30: Google announces the accepted technical writer projects
  • August 1 - September 1: Community bonding: Technical writers get to know mentors and the open source community, and refine their projects in collaboration with their mentors
  • September 2 - November 29: Technical writers work with open source mentors on the accepted projects, and submit their work at the end of the period
  • December 10: Google publishes the list of successfully-completed projects.
See the full timeline for details, including the provision for projects that run longer than three months.

Join us

Explore the Season of Docs website at g.co/seasonofdocs to learn more about participating in the program. Check out our mailing lists and Slack to get more information and join the community. Use our logo and other promotional resources to spread the word. Examine the timeline, check out the FAQ, and apply now!

By Andrew Chen, Google Open Source and Sarah Maddox, Google Technical Writer

Open sourcing Science Journal iOS

Thursday, March 28, 2019



Google’s Science Journal app enables you to use the sensors in your mobile devices to perform science experiments. We believe anyone can be a scientist anywhere. Science doesn’t just happen in the classroom or lab—tools like Science Journal let you see how the world works with just your phone. From learning about sound and motion to discovering how atmospheric pressure works, Science Journal helps you understand and measure the world around you.

We’re extremely excited to announce that we’re open sourcing this powerful science tool. We know the heart of science is not just critical thinking, but also knowledge sharing, building on discoveries, and learning about the world. Have a student with a knack for building things? Do you want to learn how mobile applications are put together? Download our source code, make changes and discoveries, and then deploy the newly-modified app to your own iOS device.

Why open source?

Inquiring minds are always asking, “How does this work?” With our open source app, there are many science and engineering topics to explore! For example, we use the Fast Fourier transform in our iOS code, but you may ask “how did you do that?” Because you can see our source code, you can discover-- not just that we used the Fast Fourier transform-- but how the algorithm works. We also make it possible to graph many sensor values in realtime and now you can see exactly how we’ve made that possible.

If you aren’t an iOS or Android engineer, don’t fret! You can even learn how apps are put together so you can build your own. Learning from, and making modifications to, open source code has helped countless Google engineers explore complicated topics and learn new skills.



Have you ever wished you could do something with Science Journal that it doesn’t currently do? Do you have an idea for building a new sensor and displaying its data in Science Journal? Maybe you’ve wanted to experiment with changing colors or fonts in the app, or even changing the Science Journal app icon to be a labrador with a lab coat? Now you can, by forking our repo, making changes, and committing them in your fork!

If you think your changes are amazing and should be included in Google’s Science Journal App, read our contribution guide. But if you want to keep your changes to yourself and your friends, well, that’s cool too! We’d love to see what you’ve built, so you can tweet at us @GScienceJournal, or just use the #myScienceJournal hashtag on Twitter.

By Joshua Liebowitz, iOS Tech Lead

Celebrating the Apache Software Foundation's 20th anniversary

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

This week we join free and open source software communities around the world in celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). It’s a huge milestone, and as we reflect on it we know there’s a lot to be grateful for.

Google makes extensive use of Apache projects, contribute our own, and most of our open source projects are released under an Apache 2 license. Our community of Googlers decided to mark 20 years of The Apache Way by sharing their thoughts about ASF…

… and we can hardly think of a more fitting way than to do that in the style of a mailing list thread:

FWD: [Discuss] 20 years of The Apache Way

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Gris Cuevas <griscuevas@apache.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2019 at 9:20 a.m.
Subject: Fwd: [DISCUSS] 20 years of The Apache Way
To: The World <dev@world.apache.org>

When we think about the early days of the Internet one of the first names that comes to mind is the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) and its contributions to Open Source! In fact, as I was recently told by a friend in the community, whenever she hears “Apache”, in a technology context, she automatically thinks about the Internet. I was in awe of her testament!

Here are the things I’d love to raise my glass to:

The Apache Way, for Being an Impressive Model for Collaborative Development
Technology as we know it wouldn’t be possible without the outstanding contributions of volunteers from all over the world, who under the umbrella of “The Apache Way,” have developed and maintained some of the most sophisticated software over the years.

When I joined Apache Beam, just a few months after its graduation as a top-level project, I realized how much work could be accomplished by the collaborative culture and the consensus driven decision making fostered by the ASF. Sure, sometimes things might drag a little behind the release schedule. But looking at the big picture, the developments that occurred in the last 20 years have significantly changed and enhanced our lives as they became the backbone and remain at the forefront of technology innovation.

The Community > Code
The Apache model recognizes contributors that help a project thrive, not only with code but also with contributions in project advocacy, documentation and community management. When I became the second non-code committer to Apache Beam, I realized how lucky I was to be part of a project that recognizes contributions of all type. I felt empowered and even more committed to the project. I’m passionate about building communities in open source, which aim to better the world, and I am committed to fostering a positive, diverse culture in which all ideas and perspectives are welcome and all members of  the community have an equal opportunity to influence the technology.

The Apache Way model positions the community at the center of a project, caring for the individuals, their rights and responsibilities. People participate based on their merit and not based on any external affiliation, title, or education.

Ever since, my mission has been to act as an ambassador for Apache projects at Google and to increase our contributions to Apache projects.

I hope you all join us, sharing stories and taking a moment to be grateful for what 20 years of strong open source practices have brought to the world.

Gris Cuevas
Google Cloud - Open Source Strategist


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Aizhamal Nurmamat kyzy <aizhamal@apache.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2019 at 8:26 a.m.
Subject: Fwd: [DISCUSS] 20 years of The Apache Way
To: The World <dev@world.apache.org>

What a great occasion to celebrate! 20 years is no easy feat, and as the Apache Way has taught us, something like this can only be accomplished through enabling communities to grow healthily.

I want to raise my glass to the many ways in which the Apache Way has been implemented across all of the Apache projects. As I’ve been becoming familiar with different communities, I’ve observed how each one is different. Some of them are young and full of energy. Others are older and wiser. They have all adopted the Apache Way, and implemented it in ways that suit them. This has let them build vibrant and diverse communities, attract new users and contributors, and help them mature into full citizens of their projects.

As a new contributor, seeing these different communities thrive fills me with hope that 20 years is just the beginning, and we will see many more years of exciting projects and communities coming from the ASF.

So, cheers to 20 years of great communities! And here’s to 20 more!

Aizhamal Nurmamat kyzy
Google Cloud - Open Source Program Manager


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Joana Carrasqueira <joana@apache.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2019 at 8:20 a.m.
Subject: [DISCUSS] 20 years of The Apache Way
To: The World <dev@world.apache.org>

Hello community,

I would like to invite you all to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the Apache Software Foundation on March 26th!

To acknowledge this historic moment, I would like to start a [Discuss] thread so everyone can share Apache related milestones and memories they would like to celebrate with our vibrant community!

Apache Software is so ubiquitous that I believe it is safe to say that the ASF can be hailed as one of the most successful influencers in Open Source and I feel very grateful for being part of this vibrant community.

I would like to start by raising my glass to the organization of the Beam Summits 2019! It is an absolute pleasure being part of the team that is behind the scenes, pulling these events together to ensure we provide new and advanced contributors with the best tools and resources to continuously support the Apache Beam Project. In addition, I am very grateful for supporting the development of a diverse community, creating the mechanisms by which everybody can share knowledge and expertise.

Please join me in celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Apache Software Foundation and the contributions of thousands of contributors, who work every day to make the Apache community a success!

Joana Carrasqueira
Google Cloud - Open Source Events Manager

Accepting student applications for Google Summer of Code 2019

Monday, March 25, 2019

We are now accepting applications from university students who want to participate in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2019. Want to hone your software development skills while doing good for the open source community?

This year we are celebrating 15 years of introducing university students from around the world to open source software communities and our passionate community of mentors. For 3three months students code from the comfort of their homes and receive stipends based on thefor successful completion of their project milestones.

Past participants say the real-world experience that GSoC provides sharpened their technical skills, boosted their confidence, expanded their professional network and enhanced their resume.

Interested students can submit proposals on the program site between now and Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at 18:00 UTC.

While many students began preparing in late February when we announced the 200+ participating open source organizations, it’s not too late for you to start! The first step is to browse the list of organizations and look for project ideas that appeal to you. Next, reach out to the organization to introduce yourself and determine if your skills and interests are a good fit. Since spots are limited, we recommend writing a strong proposal and submitting a draft early so you can get feedback from the organization and increase the odds of being selected.

You can learn more about how to prepare by watching the video below and checking out the Student Guide and Advice for Students.


You can find more information on our website, including a full timeline of important dates. We also highly recommend reviewing the FAQ and Program Rules.

Remember to submit your proposals early as you only have until Tuesday, April 9 at 18:00 UTC. Good luck to all who apply!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Reflecting on Google Code-in 2018

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Google Code-in (GCI), our contest introducing 13-17 year olds to open source software development, wrapped up last December with impressive numbers: 3,124 students from 77 countries completed an impressive 15,323 tasks!

These students spent 7 weeks working online with 27 open source organizations. They wrote code, wrote and edited documentation, designed UI elements and logos, and conducted research. Additionally, they developed videos to teach others about open source software, as well as found (and fixed!) hundreds of bugs.

Overview

  • 2,164 students completed three or more tasks (earning a Google Code-in 2018 t-shirt)
  • 17% of students were girls
  • 79% of students were first time participants in GCI
  • We saw very large increases in the number of students from Austria, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Taiwan

Student Age

Participating Schools

Students from 1,673 schools competed in this year’s contest. Many students learn about GCI from their friends or teachers and continue to spread the word to their classmates. This year the 5 schools with the most students completing tasks in the contest were:
School Name Number of Student Participants Country
Dunman High School 110 Singapore
Indus E.M High School 73 India
Sacred Heart Convent Senior Secondary School 69 India
Amity International School Sec-46 Gurgaon 36 India
Bhartiya Vidya Bhavan Vidyashram Pratap Nagar 27 India

Countries

This year we welcome winners and finalists from 77 countries, including 9 "first time" countries; Georgia, Macedonia, Philippines, South Africa, Spain, Israel, Luxembourg, Nepal and Pakistan.

The chart below displays the 10 countries with the most students completing at least 1 task.

What's Next

In June we will welcome all 54 grand prize winners to the San Francisco Bay Area for a fun-filled trip. The trip includes the opportunity for students to meet with one of the mentors they worked with during the contest. Students will also take part in an awards ceremony, meet with Google engineers to hear about new and exciting projects, tours of the Google campuses and a fun day exploring San Francisco.

We are thrilled that Google Code-in was so popular this year. We hope to continue to grow and expand this contest in the future to introduce even more teenagers to the exciting world of open source software.

Thank you again to the people who make this program possible: the 789 mentors from 57 countries that guided students through the program and welcomed them into their open source communities.

By Saranya Sampat, Google Open Source

iOS Accessibility Scanner Framework

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

At Google, we are committed to accessibility and are constantly looking for ways to improve our development process to discover, debug and fix accessibility issues. Today we are excited to announce a new open source project: Accessibility Scanner for iOS (or GSCXScanner as we lovingly call it). This is a developer tool that can assist in locating and fixing accessibility issues while an app is being developed.

App development can be a time consuming process, especially when it involves human testers. Sometimes, as in the case with accessibility testing, they are necessary. A developer can write automated tests to perform some accessibility checks, but GSCXScanner takes this one step further. When a new feature is being developed, often there are several iterations of code changes, building, launching and trying out the new feature. It is faster and easier to fix accessibility issues with the feature if they can be detected during this phase when the developer is working with the new feature.

GSCXScanner lives in your app process and can perform accessibility checks on the UI currently on the screen simply with the touch of a button. The scanner’s UI which is overlaid on the app can be moved around so you can use your app normally and trigger a scan only when you need it. Also, it uses GTXiLib, a library of iOS accessibility checks to scan your app, and you can author your own GTX checks and have them run along with scanner’s default checks.

Using the scanner does not eliminate the need for manual testing or automated tests, these are must haves for delivering quality products. But GCSXScanner can speed up the development process by showing issues in app during development.

Help us improve GSCXScanner by suggesting a feature or better yet, writing one.

By Sid Janga, Central Accessibility Team

Introducing the Continuous Delivery Foundation, the new home for Tekton, Jenkins, Jenkins X and Spinnaker

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

We're excited to announce that Google is a founding member of the newly formed Continuous Delivery Foundation (CDF). Continuous delivery (CD) is a critical part of modern software development and DevOps practices, and we're excited to collaborate in a vendor-neutral foundation with other industry leaders.

We're also thrilled to announce the contribution of two projects as part of our membership: Tekton, and in collaboration with Netflix, Spinnaker. These donations will enter alongside Jenkins and Jenkins X, providing an exciting portfolio of projects for the CDF to expand upon.

Continuous Delivery Foundation

Currently, the continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) tool landscape is highly fragmented. As companies migrate to the cloud and modernize their infrastructure, tooling decisions become increasingly complicated and difficult. DevOps practitioners constantly seek guidance on software delivery best practices and how to secure their software supply chains but gathering this information can be difficult. Enter the CDF.

The CDF is about more than just code. Modern application development brings new challenges around security and compliance. This foundation will work to define the practices and guidelines that, together with tooling, will help application developers everywhere deliver better and more secure software at speed.

At a foundation level, the CDF will help make CI/CD tooling easier. And at a project level, Tekton helps address complexity problems at their core. We will team up with the open source community and industry leaders to design and build the critical pieces common to CI/CD systems.

Tekton

Tekton is a set of shared, open source components for building CI/CD systems. It provides a flexible, extensible workflow that accommodates deployment to Kubernetes, VMs, bare metal, mobile or even emerging use cases.

The project’s goal is to provide industry specifications for pipelines, workflows, source code access and other primitives. It modernizes the continuous delivery control plane by leveraging all of the built-in scaling, reliability, and extensibility advantages of Kubernetes, and moves software deployment logic there. Tekton was initially built as a part of Knative, but given its stand-alone power, and ability to deploy to a variety of targets, we’ve decided to separate its functionality out into a new project.

Today, Tekton includes primitives for pipeline definition, source code access, artifact management, and test execution. The project roadmap includes adding support for results and event triggering in the coming months. We also plan to work with CI/CD vendors to build out an ecosystem of components that will allow you to use Tekton with existing tools like Jenkins X, Knative and others.

Spinnaker

Spinnaker is an open source, multi-cloud continuous delivery platform originally created by Netflix and jointly led by Netflix and Google. It is typically used in organizations at scale, where DevOps teams support multiple development teams, and has been battle-tested in production by hundreds of teams and in millions of deployments.

Spinnaker is a multi-component system that conceptually aligns with Tekton, and that includes many features important to making continuous delivery reliable, including support for advanced deployment strategies, and Kayenta, an open source canary analysis service.

Given Google’s significant contributions to both Tekton and Spinnaker, we’re very pleased to see them become part of the same foundation. Spinnaker’s large user community has a great deal of experience in the continuous delivery domain, and joining the CDF provides a great opportunity to share that expertise with the broader community.

Next Steps

To learn more about the CDF, listen to this week's Kubernetes Podcast from Google, where the guest is Tracy Miranda, Director of Open Source Community from our partner CloudBees.

If you'd like to participate in the future of Tekton, Spinnaker, or the CDF, please join us in Barcelona, Spain, on May 20th at the Continuous Delivery Summit ahead of KubeCon/CloudNativeCon EU. If you can’t make it, don’t worry, as there will be many opportunities to get involved and become a part of the community.

We look forward to working with the continuous delivery community on shaping the next wave of CI/CD innovations, alignments, and improvements, no matter where your applications are delivered to.

By Dan Lorenc and Kim Lewandowski, DevOps at Google Cloud

Introducing Season of Docs

Monday, March 11, 2019

Google Open Source is delighted to announce Season of Docs, a new program which fosters the open source contributions of technical writers.

Season of Docs brings technical writers and open source projects together for a few months to work on open source documentation. 2019 is the first time we’re running this exciting new program.

Join us in making a substantive contribution to open source software development around the world.

Fostering collaboration between open source projects and technical writers

The Open Source Survey showed that documentation is highly valued in open source communities, yet there’s little good documentation out there. Why? Because creating documentation is hard. But...

There are people who know how to do docs well. Technical writers know how to structure a documentation site so that people can find and understand the content. They know how to write docs that fit the needs of their audience. Technical writers can also help optimize a community’s processes for open source contribution and on-boarding new contributors.

During Season of Docs, technical writers will spend a few months working closely with open source communities. Each writer works with their chosen open source project. The writers bring their expertise to the projects’ documentation while at the same time learning about open source and new technologies.

Mentors from participating open source organizations share knowledge of their communities’ processes and tools. Together the technical writers and mentors build a new doc set, improve the structure of the existing docs, develop a much-needed tutorial, or improve contribution processes and guides. See more ideas for technical writing projects.

By working together in Season of Docs we raise awareness of open source, of docs, and of technical writing.

How does it work?

  • April 2-23: Open source organizations apply to take part in Season of Docs
  • April 30: Google publishes the list of accepted mentoring organizations, along with their ideas for documentation projects
  • April 30 - June 28: Technical writers choose the project they’d like to work on and submit their proposals to Season of Docs 
  • July 30: Google announces the accepted technical writer projects
  • August 1 - September 1: Community bonding: Technical writers get to know mentors and the open source community, and refine their projects in collaboration with their mentors
  • September 2 - November 29: Technical writers work with open source mentors on the accepted projects, and submit their work at the end of the period
  • December 10: Google publishes the list of  successfully-completed projects.
See the timeline for details, including the provision for projects that run longer than three months.

Join us

Explore the Season of Docs website at g.co/seasonofdocs to learn more about participating in the program. Use our logo and other promotional resources to spread the word. Examine the timeline, check out the FAQ, and get ready to apply!

By Sarah Maddox, Google Technical Writer and Andrew Chen, Google Open Source

And the Google Summer of Code 2019 mentor organizations are...

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

We are excited to announce the open source projects and organizations that have been accepted for Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2019, the 15th year of the program! As usual, we received more applications this year than we did last year, about twice as many as we are able to accept into the program.

After careful review, we have chosen 207 open source projects to be mentor organizations this year, 28 of which are new to the program. Please see the program website for a complete list of the accepted organizations.

Are you a student interested in participating? We begin accepting student applications on Monday, March 25, 2019 at 18:00 UTC and the deadline to apply is Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at 18:00 UTC.

The most successful applications come from students who start preparing now. You can start by watching the short video below, checking out the Student Guide, and reviewing the list of accepted organizations and reaching out to the 2 or 3 that interest you the most now - before the application period begins.


You can find more information on our website, including a full timeline of important dates. We also highly recommend perusing the FAQ and Program Rules and watching the short videos with more details about GSoC for students and mentors.

A hearty congratulations–and thank you–to all of our mentor organizations! We look forward to working with all of you during Google Summer of Code 2019.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

arXiv LaTeX cleaner: safer and easier open source research papers

Friday, February 22, 2019

Open source is usually associated with code behind utilities and applications, though you can find it in many other places: such as the LaTeX source code that describes the PDFs of scientific papers.

As an example, the following source code:


Generates this PDF when compiled using pdflatex:
You can see a huge repository of such open source code at arXiv.org, an open access repository of scientific papers currently containing about 1.5 million entries (140,616 uploads in 2018). One can not only download all papers in PDF format, but also obtain the source code to regenerate them and freely reuse any of their parts.

Open sourcing LaTeX code, however, comes with its risks and challenges. We’ve built and released the code of arXiv LaTeX cleaner to remedy some of these.

Scrubbing the Code

The main risk one faces when sharing LaTeX code with the world is accidentally releasing private information, primarily through commented code left over in the file itself.

While authors put a lot of effort into polishing the final PDF, the code isn’t usually cleaned up and is left with many pieces of text that don’t actually appear in the PDF. Things like, “I do not see why the following statement should be correct,” or “Look, I’m citing you!,” make it into arXiv for everyone to see. This happens so often there’s even a Twitter bot that finds and publishes them!

Cleaning up this commented out code manually is laborious, so arXiv LaTeX cleaner automatically removes it for you.

Private information can also be found in the many auxiliary files that LaTeX generates when the code is compiled. Some of them are needed in arXiv (e.g., .bbl files), some of them are not: arXiv LaTeX cleaner will delete the unneeded ones and keep the rest automatically.

Cleaning and Autoscaling Images

Challenges also come our way when preparing the code to submit to arXiv: one needs to upload a ZIP file smaller than 10 MBytes. With high resolution pictures and figures, it’s easy to go beyond the limit.

Manually resizing images and deleting images that aren’t actually in the final version is time consuming and cumbersome, so arXiv LaTeX cleaner does that automatically, too. If there’s a very intricate figure you’d like to keep in high resolution, you can specify a list of images and their expected resolution.

We hope that, by making open sourcing research papers faster and safer, arXiv LaTeX cleaner will help even more researchers embrace open access and make their work freely available.

arXiv LaTeX cleaner itself is open source, so you can adapt it to your needs. If you think your adaptation would be useful for others, we’d love your contributions, too.

By Jordi Pont-Tuset, Machine Perception team

Open sourcing ClusterFuzz

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Fuzzing is an automated method for detecting bugs in software that works by feeding unexpected inputs to a target program. It is effective at finding memory corruption bugs, which often have serious security implications. Manually finding these issues is both difficult and time consuming, and bugs often slip through despite rigorous code review practices. For software projects written in an unsafe language such as C or C++, fuzzing is a crucial part of ensuring their security and stability.

In order for fuzzing to be truly effective, it must be continuous, done at scale, and integrated into the development process of a software project. To provide these features for Chrome, we wrote ClusterFuzz, a fuzzing infrastructure running on over 25,000 cores. Two years ago, we began offering ClusterFuzz as a free service to open source projects through OSS-Fuzz.

Today, we’re announcing that ClusterFuzz is now open source and available for anyone to use.



We developed ClusterFuzz over eight years to fit seamlessly into developer workflows, and to make it dead simple to find bugs and get them fixed. ClusterFuzz provides end-to-end automation, from bug detection, to triage (accurate deduplication, bisection), to bug reporting, and finally to automatic closure of bug reports.

ClusterFuzz has found more than 16,000 bugs in Chrome and more than 11,000 bugs in over 160 open source projects integrated with OSS-Fuzz. It is an integral part of the development process of Chrome and many other open source projects. ClusterFuzz is often able to detect bugs hours after they are introduced and verify the fix within a day.

Check out our GitHub repository. You can try ClusterFuzz locally by following these instructions. In production, ClusterFuzz depends on some key Google Cloud Platform services, but you can use your own compute cluster. We welcome your contributions and look forward to any suggestions to help improve and extend this infrastructure. Through open sourcing ClusterFuzz, we hope to encourage all software developers to integrate fuzzing into their workflows.

By Abhishek Arya, Oliver Chang, Max Moroz, Martin Barbella and Jonathan Metzman, ClusterFuzz team

Dopamine 2.0: providing more flexibility in reinforcement learning research

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Reinforcement learning (RL) has become one of the most popular fields of machine learning, and has seen a number of great advances over the last few years. As a result, there is a growing need from both researchers and educators to have access to a clear and reliable framework for RL research and education.

Last August, we announced Dopamine, our framework for flexible reinforcement learning.  For the initial version we decided to focus on a specific type of RL research: value-based agents evaluated on the Atari 2600 framework supported by the Arcade Learning Environment. We were thrilled to see how well it was received by the community, including a live coding session, its inclusion in a recently-announced benchmark for RL, considered as the top “Cool new open source project of 2018” by the Octoverse, and over 7K GitHub stars on our repository.

One of the most common requests we have received is support for more environments. This confirms what we have seen internally, where simpler environments, such as those supported by OpenAI’s Gym, are incredibly useful when testing out new algorithms. We are happy to announce Dopamine 2.0, which includes support for discrete-domain gym environments (e.g. discrete states and actions). The core of the framework remains unchanged, we have simply generalized the interface with the environment. For backwards compatibility, users will still be able to download version 1.0.

We include default configurations for two classic control environments: CartPole and Acrobot; on these environments one can train a Dopamine agent in minutes. When compared with the training time for a standard Atari 2600 game (around 5 days on a standard GPU), these environments allow researchers to iterate much faster on research ideas before testing them out on larger Atari games. We also include a Colaboratory that illustrates how to train an agent on Cartpole and Acrobot. Finally, our GymPreprocessing class serves as an example for how to use Dopamine with other custom environments.

We are excited by the new opportunities enabled by Dopamine 2.0, and look forward to seeing what the research community creates with it!

By Pablo Samuel Castro and Marc G. Bellemare, Dopamine Team

Seeking open source projects for Google Summer of Code 2019

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Do you lead or represent a free or open source software organization? Are you seeking new contributors? (Who isn’t?) Do you enjoy the challenge and reward of mentoring new developers? Apply to be a mentor organization for Google Summer of Code 2019!

We are searching for open source projects and organizations to participate in the 15th annual Google Summer of Code (GSoC). GSoC is a global program that draws university student developers from around the world to contribute to open source. Each student spends three months working on a coding project, with the support of volunteer mentors, for participating open source organizations from late May to August.

Last year 1,264 students worked with 206 open source organizations. Organizations include individual smaller and medium sized open source projects as well as a number of umbrella organizations with many sub-projects under them (Python Software Foundation, CERN, Apache Software Foundation).

You can apply to be a mentoring organization for GSoC starting today. The deadline to apply is February 6 at 20:00 UTC. Organizations chosen for GSoC 2019 will be publicly announced on February 26.

Please visit the program site for more information on how to apply and review the detailed timeline of important deadlines. We also encourage you to check out the Mentor Guide and our short video on why open source projects choose to apply to be a part of the program.

Best of luck to all of the project applicants!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

A new chapter for OSS-Fuzz

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Cross-posted on the Google Security Blog.

Open source software (OSS) is extremely important to Google, and we rely on OSS in a variety of customer-facing and internal projects. We also understand the difficulty and importance of securing the open source ecosystem, and are continuously looking for ways to simplify it.

For the OSS community, we currently provide OSS-Fuzz, a free continuous fuzzing infrastructure hosted on the Google Cloud Platform. OSS-Fuzz uncovers security vulnerabilities and stability issues, and reports them directly to developers. Since launching in December 2016, OSS-Fuzz has reported over 9,000 bugs directly to open source developers.

In addition to OSS-Fuzz, Google's security team maintains several internal tools for identifying bugs in both Google internal and open source code. Until recently, these issues were manually reported to various public bug trackers by our security team and then monitored until they were resolved. Unresolved bugs were eligible for the Patch Rewards Program. While this reporting process had some success, it was overly complex. Now, by unifying and automating our fuzzing tools, we have been able to consolidate our processes into a single workflow, based on OSS-Fuzz. Projects integrated with OSS-Fuzz will benefit from being reviewed by both our internal and external fuzzing tools, thereby increasing code coverage and discovering bugs faster.

We are committed to helping open source projects benefit from integrating with our OSS-Fuzz fuzzing infrastructure. In the coming weeks, we will reach out via email to critical projects that we believe would be a good fit and support the community at large. Projects that integrate are eligible for rewards ranging from $1,000 (initial integration) up to $20,000 (ideal integration); more details are available here. These rewards are intended to help offset the cost and effort required to properly configure fuzzing for OSS projects. If you would like to integrate your project with OSS-Fuzz, please submit your project for review. Our goal is to admit as many OSS projects as possible and ensure that they are continuously fuzzed.

Once contacted, we might provide a sample fuzz target to you for easy integration. Many of these fuzz targets are generated with new technology that understands how library APIs are used appropriately. Watch this space for more details on how Google plans to further automate fuzz target creation, so that even more open source projects can benefit from continuous fuzzing.

Thank you for your continued contributions to the open source community. Let’s work together on a more secure and stable future for open source software.

By Matt Ruhstaller, TPM and Oliver Chang, Software Engineer, Google Security Team

The big reveal: Google Code-in 2018 winners and finalists

Monday, January 7, 2019

Our 9th consecutive year of Google Code-in (GCI) 2018 ended in mid-December. It was a very, very busy seven weeks for everyone – we had 3,124 students from 77 countries completing 15,323 tasks with a record 27 open source organizations!

Today, we are pleased to announce the Google Code-in 2018 Grand Prize Winners and Finalists with each organization. The 54 Grand Prize Winners from 19 countries completed an impressive 1,668 tasks between them while also helping other students during the contest.

Each of the Grand Prize Winners are invited to a four day trip to Google’s main campus and San Francisco offices in Northern California where they’ll meet Google engineers, meet one of the mentors they worked with during the contest, and enjoy some fun in California with the other winners. We look forward to seeing everyone later this year!
Country # of Winners Country # of Winners
Cameroon 1 Romania 1
Canada 1 Russian Federation 1
Czech Republic 1 Singapore 1
Georgia 1 South Africa 1
India 18 Spain 2
Indonesia 1 Sri Lanka 1
Macedonia 1 Ukraine 2
Netherlands 1 United Kingdom 6
Philippines 1 United States 9
Poland 4

Finalists

And a big congratulations to our 108 Finalists from 26 countries who completed over 2,350 tasks during the contest. The Finalists will all receive a special hoodie to commemorate their achievements in the contest. This year we had 1 student named as a finalist with 2 different organizations!

A breakdown of the countries represented by our finalists can be found below. 
Country # of Finalists Country # of Finalists
Canada 6 Philippines 1
China 2 Poland 15
Czech Republic 1 Russian Federation 2
Germany 1 Serbia 1
India 48 Singapore 2
Indonesia 2 South Korea 1
Israel 1 Spain 1
Kazakhstan 1 Sri Lanka 2
Luxembourg 1 Taiwan 1
Mauritius 2 Thailand 1
Mexico 1 United Kingdom 3
Nepal 1 United States 8
Pakistan 2 Uruguay 1

Mentors

This year we had 790 mentors dedicate their time and invaluable expertise to helping thousands of teenage students learn about open source by welcoming them into their communities. These mentors are the heart of GCI and the reason the contest continues to thrive. Mentors spend hundreds of hours answering questions, reviewing submitted tasks, and teaching students the basics and, in many cases, more advanced aspects of contributing to open source. GCI would not be possible without their enthusiasm and commitment.

We will post more statistics and fun stories that came from GCI 2018 here on the Google Open Source Blog over the next few months, so please stay tuned.

Congratulations to our Grand Prize Winners, Finalists, and all of the students who spent the last couple of months learning about, and contributing to, open source. We hope they will continue their journey in open source!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source
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