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Congratulations to the latest Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

We are pleased to announce the latest round of Google Open Source Peer Bonus winners and the projects they support.

Open source software is a cornerstone of software development inside and outside of Google, and the Google Open Source Peer Bonus program is one way we thank the people who make our work possible. Twice a year we invite Googlers to nominate external contributors to be rewarded for their contribution to open source projects.

This time we have a truly international team of recipients from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Ireland, France, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Singapore, Switzerland, Sweden, UK and USA. You can learn about previous recipients in these blog posts.

Projects range from Linux distributions and version control systems to monitoring and testing software. Some are part of the backbone of our industry, others are critical dependencies of specific products and services we offer. All of them are important to us!

Listed below are the individuals who gave us permission to thank them publicly:

Name Project Name Project
Sultan AlsawafAndroid KernelRavi Santosh GudimetlaKubernetes
Allan McRaeArch LinuxSteve KuznetsovKubernetes
Seth Pollackaws-encryption-providerHisham MuhammadLuaRocks
George GensureBazel BuildfarmYutaka Matsubarameinheld
Omar CornutDear ImGuiPulkit GoyalMercurial
Alessandro ArzilliDelveYuya NishiharaMercurial
Matt KleinEnvoyAdam Mummery-SmithMixin
Ivan GrokhotkovESP8266 core for ArduinoArnout EngelenNotion
Esther OnfroyExodus PrivacyBrian BrazilPrometheus
Yao LiForkliftBruno Oliveirapytest
Warner LoshFreeBSDJames FriedmanRMWC
Elijah NewrenGitSteve KlabnikRust Book
Gábor SzederGitJack LukicSemantic UI
Alvaro Viebrantzgoogle-cloud-iot-arduinoVidar HolenShellCheck
Richard MusiolGopherJS, go-wasmIvan PopelyshevSkia graphics in Chrome
Tobias FuruholmGrafeasSpencer GibbSpring Cloud
David PursehouseJGitDaniel AlmSwift gRPC
Brian GrangerJupyterYong TangTensorFlow
Rodrigo MenezeskopsJason ZamanTensorFlow, Gentoo, SELinux
Rohith JayawardenekopsKai SasakiTensorFlow.js
Kam KasraviKubeflowManraj GroverTensorFlow.js
Pete MacKinnonKubeflowStefan WeilTesseract
Christoph BleckerKubernetesSumana HarihareswaraWarehouse (PyPI)
Davanum SrinivasKubernetesJia Lizone.js

Once again we would like to express our gratitude and appreciation to current and former recipients for their hard work, time and devotion to open source. Without you these projects wouldn’t thrive!

We look forward to your ongoing contributions and can’t wait to recognize even more contributors for their work in 2019.

By Maria Tabak, Google Open Source

How we brought the latest version of Python to App Engine and Cloud Functions

Monday, August 13, 2018

At Cloud Next 2018, we added Python 3.7 support to Cloud Functions and now we’ve announced Python 3.7 support for the App Engine standard environment. These new runtimes allow you to write Python functions and apps using the latest version of Python and the rich ecosystem of packages available on Python Packaging Index (PyPI).

This new runtime marks a significant update to App Engine and was enabled by new open source software that we recently released: gVisor and FTL.

Python, straight from the source

Running Python 3.7 on App Engine and Cloud Functions required us to fundamentally rethink our infrastructure. Traditionally, meeting Google Cloud’s security requirements meant that we had to run a modified version of the Python interpreter. However, using a modified interpreter constrained some language features and only allowed us to support a limited set of whitelisted Python libraries.

Thanks to gVisor, a container sandbox that provides improved security and process isolation, we can now run the unmodified Python 3.7.0 interpreter. We’ve done extensive testing to make sure Python 3.7 is compatible with gVisor. As part of our compatibility testing, we run Python’s full suite of language tests, and tests for Python packages that are popular on PyPI. We’re committed to ensuring that everything you’ve come to know and love about Python is supported on our platform.

Seamless deployments

Most importantly, this change in our infrastructure makes it easier to take advantage of Python’s vast ecosystem. As a developer, you just add project dependencies to a requirements.txt file and deploy.

During deployment, FTL, a tool for building containers, fetches dependencies listed in your requirements.txt file and installs them alongside your app or function. FTL also includes a short-lived dependency cache, which speeds up repeated deployments if no changes are detected in your requirements.txt file. This is particularly useful if you find just need to re-deploy because you found a typo.

Keeping up with the Pythonistas

In making these changes, we also decided to expand the list of system packages that are included with each runtime’s Ubuntu 18.04 distribution. We think that will make life just a little bit easier for developers working with the latest release of Python.

Looking forward, we’re excited about how these changes will allow us to keep up with the Python community’s progress as they release new versions and libraries. Please let us know what you think and if you run into any challenges.

You can learn more about how to get started with it on App Engine and Cloud Functions in our documentation. We can’t wait to see what you build with Python 3.7.

By Stewart Reichling, Product Manager

OpenMetrics project accepted into CNCF Sandbox

Friday, August 10, 2018

For the past several months, engineers from Google Cloud, Prometheus, and other vendors have been aligning on OpenMetrics, a specification for metrics exposition. Today, the project was formally announced and accepted into the CNCF Sandbox, and we’re currently working on ways to support OpenMetrics in OpenCensus, a set of uniform tracing and stats libraries that work with multiple vendors’ services. This multi-vendor approach works to put architectural choices in the hands of developers.
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OpenMetrics stems from the stats formats used inside of Prometheus and Google’s Monarch time-series infrastructure, which underpins both Stackdriver and internal monitoring applications. As such, it is designed to be immediately familiar to developers and capable of operating at extreme scale. With additional contributions and review from AppOptics, Cortex, Datadog, InfluxData, Sysdig, and Uber, OpenMetrics has begun the cross-industry collaboration necessary to drive adoption of a new specification.

OpenCensus provides automatic instrumentation, APIs, and exporters for stats and distributed traces across C++, Java, Go, Node.js, Python, PHP, Ruby, and .Net. Each OpenCensus library allows developers to automatically capture distributed traces and key RPC-related statistics from their applications, add custom data, and export telemetry to their back-end of choice. Google has been a key collaborator in defining the OpenMetrics specification, and we’re now focusing on how to best implement this inside of OpenCensus.

“Google has a history of innovation in the metric monitoring space, from its early success with Borgmon, which has been continued in Monarch and Stackdriver. OpenMetrics embodies our understanding of what users need for simple, reliable and scalable monitoring, and shows our commitment to offering standards-based solutions,” said Sumeer Bhola, Lead Engineer on Monarch and Stackdriver at Google.

For more information about OpenMetrics, please visit openmetrics.io. For more information about OpenCensus and how you can quickly enable trace and metrics collection from your application, please visit opencensus.io.

By Morgan McLean, Product Manager for OpenCensus and Stackdriver APM
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