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Google Summer of Code 2019 (Statistics Part 1)

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Since 2005, Google Summer of Code (GSoC) has been bringing new developers into the open source community every year. This year, we accepted 1,276 students from 63 countries into the 2019 GSoC program to work with 201 open source organizations over the summer.

Students are currently wrapping up the Community Bonding phase where they become familiar with the open source projects they will be working with by spending time learning the codebase, the community’s best practices, and integrating into the community. Students will start their 12-week coding projects on May 27th.

Each year we like to share program statistics about the GSoC program and the accepted students and mentors involved in the program.

Accepted Students

  • 89.2% are participating in their first GSoC
  • 75% are first time applicants

Degrees

  • 77.5% are undergraduates, 16.6% are masters students, and 5.9% are in PhD programs
  • 72.8% are Computer Science majors, 3.5% are Mathematics majors, 16.8% are other Engineering majors (Electrical, Mechanical, Aerospace, etc.)
  • Students are in a variety of majors including Atmospheric Science, Neuroscience, Economics, Linguistics, Geology, and Pharmacy.

Proposals

There were a record number of students submitting proposals for the program this year: 5,606 students from 103 countries submitted 7,555 proposals.

In our next GSoC statistics post we will delve deeper into the schools, gender breakdown, mentors, and registration numbers for the 2019 program.

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source

Google and Binomial Partner to Open-Source Basis Universal Texture Format

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Today, Google and Binomial are excited to announce that we have partnered to open source the Basis Universal texture codec to improve the performance of transmitting images on the web and within desktop and mobile applications, while maintaining GPU efficiency. This release fills an important gap in the graphics compression ecosystem and complements earlier work in Draco geometry compression.

The Basis Universal texture format is 6-8 times smaller than JPEG on the GPU, yet is a similar storage size as JPEG – making it a great alternative to current GPU compression methods that are inefficient and don’t operate cross platform – and provides a more performant alternative to JPEG/PNG. It creates compressed textures that work well in a variety of use cases - games, virtual & augmented reality, maps, photos, small-videos, and more!

Without a universal texture format, developers are left with 2 options:

  • Use GPU formats and take the storage size hit.
  • Use other formats that have reduced storage size but couldn't compete with the GPU performance.

Maintaining so many different GPU formats is a burden on the whole ecosystem, from GPU manufacturers to software developers to the end user who can’t get a great cross platform experience. We’re streamlining this with one solution that has built-in flexibility (like optional higher quality modes) but is much easier on everyone to improve and maintain.

How does it all work? Compress your image using the encoder, choosing the quality settings that make sense for your project (you can also submit multiple images for small videos or optimization purposes, just know they’ll share the same color palette). Insert the transcoder code before rendering, which will turn the intermediary format into the GPU format your computer can read. The image stays compressed throughout this process, even on your GPU!  Instead of needing to decode and read the whole image, the GPU will read only the parts it needs. Enjoy the performance benefits!
Basis Universal can efficiently target the most common GPU formats
Google and Binomial will be working together to continue to support, maintain and add features, so check back frequently for the latest. This initial release of Basis Universal transcodes into the following GPU formats: PVRTC1 opaque, ETC1, ETC2 basic alpha, BC1-5, and BC7 opaque. Over the coming months more functionality will be added including BC7 transparent, ASTC opaque and alpha, PVRTC1 transparent, and higher quality BC7/ASTC.
Basis Universal reduces transmission size for texture while maintaining similar image quality.
See full benchmarking results
Basis Universal improves GPU memory usage over .jpeg and .png
With this partnership, we hope to see adoption of the transcoder in all major browsers to make performant cross-platform compressed textures accessible to everyone via the WebGL API, and the forthcoming WebGPU API. In addition to opening up the possibility of seamless integration into pipelines, everyone now has access to the state of the art compressor, which will also be open sourced.

We look forward to seeing what people do with Basis Universal now that it's open sourced. Check out the code and demo on GitHub, let us know what you think, and how you plan to use it! Currently, Basis Universal transcoders are available in C++ and WebAssembly.

By Stephanie Hurlburt, Binomial and Jamieson Brettle, Chrome Media

OpenTelemetry: The Merger of OpenCensus and OpenTracing

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

We’ve talked about OpenCensus a lot over the past few years, from the project’s initial announcement, roots at Google and partners (Microsoft, Dynatrace) joining the project, to new functionality that we’re continually adding. The project has grown beyond our expectations and now sports a mature ecosystem with Google, Microsoft, Omnition, Postmates, and Dynatrace making major investments, and a broad base of community contributors.

We recently announced that OpenCensus and OpenTracing are merging into a single project, now called OpenTelemetry, which brings together the best of both projects and has a frictionless migration experience. We’ve made a lot of progress so far: we’ve established a governance committee, a Java prototype API + implementation, workgroups for each language, and an aggressive implementation schedule.

Today we’re highlighting the combined project at the keynote of Kubecon and announcing that OpenTelemetry is now officially part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation! Full details are available in the CNCF’s official blog post, which we’ve copied below:

A Brief History of OpenTelemetry (So Far)

After many months of planning, discussion, prototyping, more discussion, and more planning, OpenTracing and OpenCensus are merging to form OpenTelemetry, which is now a CNCF sandbox project. The seed governance committee is composed of representatives from Google, Lightstep, Microsoft, and Uber, and more organizations are getting involved every day.

And we couldn't be happier about it – here’s why.

Observability, Outputs, and High-Quality Telemetry

Observability is a fashionable word with some admirably nerdy and academic origins. In control theory, “observability” measures how well we can understand the internals of a given system using only its external outputs. If you’ve ever deployed or operated a modern, microservice-based software application, you have no doubt struggled to understand its performance and behavior, and that’s because those “outputs” are usually meager at best. We can’t understand a complex system if it’s a black box. And the only way to light up those black boxes is with high-quality telemetry: distributed traces, metrics, logs, and more.

So how can we get our hands – and our tools – on precise, low-overhead telemetry from the entirety of a modern software stack? One way would be to carefully instrument every microservice, piece by piece, and layer by layer. This would literally work, it’s also a complete non-starter – we’d spend as much time on the measurement as we would on the software itself! We need telemetry as a built-in feature of our services.

The OpenTelemetry project is designed to make this vision a reality for our industry, but before we describe it in more detail, we should first cover the history and context around OpenTracing and OpenCensus.

OpenTracing and OpenCensus

In practice, there are several flavors (or “verticals” in the diagram) of telemetry data, and then several integration points (or “layers” in the diagram) available for each. Broadly, the cloud-native telemetry landscape is dominated by distributed traces, timeseries metrics, and logs; and end-users typically integrate with a thin instrumentation API or via straightforward structured data formats that describe those traces, metrics, or logs.



For several years now, there has been a well-recognized need for industry-wide collaboration in order to amortize the shared cost of software instrumentation. OpenTracing and OpenCensus have led the way in that effort, and while each project made different architectural choices, the biggest problem with either project has been the fact that there were two of them. And, further, that the two projects weren’t working together and striving for mutual compatibility.

Having two similar-yet-not-identical projects out in the world created confusion and uncertainty for developers, and that made it harder for both efforts to realize their shared mission: built-in, high-quality telemetry for all.

Getting to One Project

If there’s a single thing to understand about OpenTelemetry, it’s that the leadership from OpenTracing and OpenCensus are co-committed to migrating their respective communities to this single and unified initiative. Although all of us have numerous ideas about how we could boil the ocean and start from scratch, we are resisting those impulses and focusing instead on preparing our communities for a successful transition; our priorities for the merger are clear:
  • Straightforward backwards compatibility with both OpenTracing and OpenCensus (via software bridges)
  • Minimizing the time where OpenTelemetry, OpenTracing, and OpenCensus are being co-developed: we plan to put OpenTracing and OpenCensus into “readonly mode” before the end of 2019.
  • And, again, to simplify and standardize the telemetry solutions available to developers.
In many ways, it’s most accurate to think of OpenTelemetry as the next major version of both OpenTracing and OpenCensus. Like any version upgrade, we will try to make it easy for both new and existing end-users, but we recognize that the main benefit to the ecosystem is the consolidation itself – not some specific and shiny new feature – and we are prioritizing our own efforts accordingly.

How you can help

OpenTelemetry’s timeline is an aggressive one. While we have many open-source and vendor-licensed observability solutions providing guidance, we will always want as many end-users involved as possible. The single most valuable thing any end-user can do is also one of the easiest: check out the actual work we’re doing and provide feedback. Via GitHub, Gitter, email, or whatever feels easiest.

Of course we also welcome code contributions to OpenTelemetry itself, code contributions that add OpenTelemetry support to existing software projects, documentation, blog posts, and the rest of it. If you’re interested, you can sign up to join the integration effort by filling in this form.

By Ben Sigelman, co-creator of OpenTracing and member of the OpenTelemetry governing committee, and Morgan McLean, Product Manager for OpenCensus at Google since the project’s inception
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